Posts in: Editorial

Warning message from Dallas

August 2016

The killing of five police in Dallas by a veteran of the U.S. war in Afghanistan was an act of desperation against an enemy — the U.S. police — whose relentless murders of people of color are rarely prosecuted. The two now famous police victims, Alton Sterling of Baton Rouge, La., and Philando Castile in… Read more »

The Standing Rock fight is for all of us

October 2016

When a security company set dogs on people challenging bulldozers in North Dakota on Sept. 3, the scalding images recalled similar violence against civil rights protesters in Birmingham, Ala., in 1963. And just as that Birmingham struggle was a defining moment, so too is the struggle for water and sovereignty by the Standing Rock Sioux… Read more »

India’s general strike largest in history

October 2016

It’s almost impossible to imagine 180 million workers on strike and marching against their government. But it happened. In India. On Sept. 2, 2016. And it will happen again. It’s not impossible to understand why this strike was so mammoth and intense. Half the Indian population — 1.6 billion — live without enough food, energy,… Read more »

In solidarity with protesting athletes

October 2016

Hats off to Colin Kaepernick, the San Francisco 49ers quarterback who refuses to stand for the national anthem at NFL games. “I am not going to stand up to show pride in a flag for a country that oppresses Black people and people of color.” He’s also spoken out for police accountability and against cop… Read more »

Electoral College is a legacy of slavery

December 2016

Clinton actually beat Trump by about a million votes. Yet, absurdly, he is the next prez. Twice in the last five presidential elections the popular vote winner lost. Why? Because the Electoral College was written into the U.S. Constitution to undermine democracy and uphold slave-owners power. When the Constitution was drafted most states granted voting… Read more »

Syria’s ruin at the hands of capital

December 2016

We live in times so poverty stricken, turbulent, repressive and violent that the majority of people can hardly breathe. That’s why they’re rising up in every corner of the world. Syria’s insurrection, a proud part of the Arab Spring in 2011, is a breathtaking example. A people who had lived four decades under a deadly… Read more »

Putin: the cost of turning back history

February 2017

With Putin’s supposed meddling in the U.S. election making headlines, a deeper question surfaces: How did the world’s first workers’ state become a country that could produce such a repressive, war-mongering capitalist autocrat? The answer lies first in the decades of U.S.-led aggression aimed at starving and isolating the Russian Revolution — and then in… Read more »

A slippery slope in choice for Defense

February 2017

Trump’s dangerous choice of General James Mattis for Secretary of Defense goes against a fundamental principle of U.S. democracy, limited as it is: civilian control of the military. The 1947 National Security Act requires Defense Secretaries to have been in civilian life for a significant number of years (formerly 10, now seven) if they have… Read more »

The art of Black working-class life

February 2017

After last year’s hashtag #OscarsSoWhite, it’s refreshing to see two fine films about African American working people. Loving’s true story shows a brave couple persevering with their 9-year Supreme Court case that finally struck down laws against inter-racial marriage in 1967. Fences, by playwright August Wilson, delves into the strengths and tensions of a Black… Read more »

Standing with the trans community

April 2017

When the Supreme Court refused to hear a case brought by a young trans man and in fact overturned his victory in a lower court, they sentenced trans youth to continuing harassment, beatings, illnesses, suicides, and murders! This deplorable decision was engineered by the Trump regime when they overturned the nationwide guideline requiring schools to… Read more »