Posts in: asia

Review of Hardly War — Memories of the “Forgotten War”

October 2016

Hardly War, by Don Mee Choi / Wave Books, 2016 / Illustrated; 97 pages Don Mee Choi is a South Korean poet, translator and anti-militarist now living in the U.S. Through a startling, kaleidoscopic collection of prose, poems, and photographs in her new book, Hardly War, she makes a powerful case against the U.S. justification… Read more »

Turkey: a police state in the making

February 2017

Turkey’s internal political divisions and its role in the turbulent Middle East remain unexplained in the mainstream media. To begin with, Prime Minister Recep Erdoğan is a right-wing politician and Muslim fundamentalist. He founded the ruling capitalist party, Justice and Development. Economic austerities imposed on Turks by neoliberal privatization policies created mounting opposition, which was… Read more »

Putin: the cost of turning back history

February 2017

With Putin’s supposed meddling in the U.S. election making headlines, a deeper question surfaces: How did the world’s first workers’ state become a country that could produce such a repressive, war-mongering capitalist autocrat? The answer lies first in the decades of U.S.-led aggression aimed at starving and isolating the Russian Revolution — and then in… Read more »

The Obama administration: Itching for a new war on the Korean Peninsula?

April 12, 2013

If you read the newspaper or watch TV, you know that something dangerous is going on in the Korean Peninsula. You likely know that Kim Jong-un, North Korea’s young leader, tested a long range rocket in December and set off an underground nuclear bomb in February. Since then he’s been issuing threats to South Korea… Read more »

Occupy Wall Street updates from far flung corners of the world

November 18, 2011

Melbourne, Australia Occupy Melbourne’s Indigenous Working Group is leading the call to evict Melbourne Mayor Robert Doyle. Freedom Socialist Party and Radical Women took part in this angry demonstration linking Aboriginal sovereignty to the rights of the 99% to resist. Members of Aboriginal Nations declared that Doyle has neither the right to evict Occupy from… Read more »

China — Great Leap Into Turmoil

Spring 1977

Eight months after the death of Mao Tse-tung, the decade-long power struggle between his collaborators and the current ruling bureaucracy appears to have ended. The new Communist Party chairman, Hua Kuo-feng, has apparently consolidated control. The sudden arrest last October of “The Gang of Four” — Chiang Ching, Yao Wen-yuan, Chang Chun-chiao and Wang Hung-wen,… Read more »

Vance’s Peking Visit Becomes a Chinese Puzzle

Fall 1977

It was nothing less than a diplomatic triumph, they said. when Secretary of State Cyrus Vance returned from China. A beaming Pres. Carter hailed the talks as a “major step forward in normalizing relations with the People’s Republic of China,” and the Peking Review reported “enhanced mutual understanding.” The press played it to the hilt…. Read more »

Deng: from Seattle to Vietnam

Spring 1979

Deng: from Seattle to Vietnam The Vice Premier made very good copy. Deng Xsaioping sporting a cowboy hat, eating barbecue, trying out a space flight simulator, sipping Coke, toasting U.S. capitalists and politicians — he was so charming. He departed Seattle, Washington, USA vowing peace and friendship. He sped home to Beijing — and launched… Read more »

Kampuchea: Vietnamese “Invasion” or Civil War?

Spring 1979

Bitter war rages in Kampuchea (Cambodia) as two armies — the Khmer Rouge and the Kampuchean National United Front for National Salvation (KNUFNS) — contend for control of the country. In December, 1978 the KNUFNS army, comprised of 100,000 Vietnamese troops and 20,000 Kampuchean rebels, launched a drive into Kampuchea and rapidly took over all… Read more »