Posts in: International

Work Choices can be defeated!

Summer/Autumn 2007

Australian workers have some decisions of their own to make about the Howard Government’s WorkChoices legislation, currently transforming the industrial landscape. In New Zealand (NZ), workers were attacked with very similar industrial legislation in the 1990s, and the hard lessons kept coming, even after the election of a Labour government. Aussie workers may want to… Read more »

Kabul in Winter: the ravages of war and religious rule in Afghanistan

Summer/Autumn 2007

Kabul in Winter: Life without Peace in Afghanistan (Metropolitan Books, Henry Holt and Company, New York, 2006) hits hard in the gut while absorbing the mind. The book is a scathing indictment of U.S. policies that promoted the rise of Islamic fundamentalism, used the plight of Afghan women to justify an unjust war, and finally… Read more »

Water is a feminist issue

Summer/Autumn 2007

Victoria burning, Melburnians choking from the smoke, parched land everywhere. This is life in the southeast corner of the earth’s driest continent. Across the Pacific, on the U.S.-Canadian border, pre-Christmas storms flooded homes, cut power and blocked main roads. On Christmas day, post-tsunami Aceh and North Sumatra were once again under water and mud. These… Read more »

Free, 24-hour Childcare is a necessity, not a pipe dream!

Summer/Autumn 2007

One hundred sixty-two thousand working mothers in Australia would return to work if they could access childcare. And that’s only the official figure! If free, 24-hour childcare were available, the number would be zero. “Free?! This is utopian. Impossible!” say many feminists who believe strongly in women’s right to childcare. Not only is this solution… Read more »

Yellow Woman Speaks by Merle Woo

Summer/Autumn 2007

Merle Woo’s poetry achieves a rare combination of substance and style. Undoubtedly political, often shocking, Yellow Woman Speaks is a pleasure to read. Her conversational, open, no-bull tone made me feel, as I turned page after page, that I was not sitting alone in my room reading, but engaged in an intense and wonderful discussion… Read more »

Two initiatives to remember Errol Wyles Junior

Summer/Autumn 2007

Poet, Amelia Walker, came up with the idea of producing a zine to pay tribute to Errol Wyles Junior after she attended a screening of Black and White Justice, hosted by the Indigenous Social Justice Association (Melbourne Supporters Group). A major issue discussed that night was the lack of public awareness of how and why… Read more »

Queensland DPP fails Palm Island Community

Summer/Autumn 2007

“The whole system is rotten and needs to be changed,” said Ray Jackson, President of the Indigenous Social Justice Association, after hearing about the decision of Queensland’s Director of Public Prosecutions (DPP) not to charge Senior Sergeant Chris Hurley for his role in the 19 November 2004 death of Mulrunji Doomadgee on Palm Island. DPP… Read more »

The Tale of Two Dictators

Summer/Autumn 2007

Last December Chilean dictator, Augusto Pinochet, died peacefully in bed. Contrast this with the demise of Saddam Hussein, executed later that month in a ghoulish vengeance killing videoed and posted on the Internet. Both had been renowned for carrying out the dirty work of U.S. Imperialism. Why were they treated so differently? To protect the… Read more »

How Marxists think

Summer/Autumn 2007

Cast your mind back to the days following September 11, 2001. George W Bush issued an ultimatum to the peoples of the world: “You’re either with us or with the terrorists.” Politicians are particularly good at simplifying an issue beyond the point of absurdity. However, this spin doctoring is useful, because it shows the limitations… Read more »