Posts in: International

How the Howard Government used refugee policy to attack workers’ rights

Winter/Spring 2005

Even the Murdoch newspapers called it a “bloody disgrace.” Cornelia Rau, an Australian resident, had spent 10 months in immigration detention.  Despite the fact that she was listed as a missing person in Queensland, no attempts had been made to establish who she was. Her use of a pseudonym and a nearly imperceptible German accent… Read more »

Momentum builds to boycott the Melbourne Stolenwealth Games

Winter/Spring 2005

The fiery battle for Land Rights was the big news of the 1982 Brisbane Commonwealth Games. Footage of massive protests by Aboriginal people and their supporters was beamed around the world. Aboriginal people in their hundreds occupied Musgrave Park in central Brisbane. Hundreds of demonstrators — such as Biri woman and story teller, Maureen Watson… Read more »

Indigenous land is NOT for sale

Winter/Spring 2005

The Howard Government has already announced its plans to attack working people through the combination of its anti-union laws and attacks on welfare. But unless faced with mass resistance, it won’t stop there. On its medium-term agenda it is dismantling Aboriginal land rights legislation in order to open up communally-owned land to unfettered corporate plunder…. Read more »

Break the blackout on repression in Nepal

Winter/Spring 2005

Democratic rights suspended. The people of Nepal are locked in a battle to restore their basic democratic rights. On 1 February, King Gyanendra abrogated the constitution, declared a state of emergency and imposed a reign of terror. No section of society is safe. Union offices have been closed and leaders arrested. Journalists can be jailed… Read more »

The tale of two conferences: National Union Fightback and the Socialist Alliance National Conferences

Winter/Spring 2005

The contrast could not have been greater.  On Saturday 11 June, Socialist Alliance (SA) organised a militant National Union Fightback Conference, involving not only rank-and-file unionists, but the leaders of fighting unions across the country and representatives of the combative UNITE union from New Zealand. Arising from this historic gathering was a defiant statement pointing… Read more »

Mass action, not restrictive laws, will stop anti-abortion violence

Winter/Spring 2005

In March, the Victorian Labor Party government foreshadowed legislation to prevent anti-abortionist protesters from approaching within a certain distance of fertility clinics. On several occasions, abortion rights activists from university campuses and Radical Women have defended the clinic. Over the past months, clients and staff of the Fertility Control Clinic in East Melbourne have been… Read more »

Scrap the sexist defence of provocation!

Summer/Autumn 2005

In July 2003, Julie Ramage told her husband James that she was leaving him. So he killed her. In October 2004, the Victorian Supreme Court jury found him guilty of manslaughter, not murder, because she provoked him. The argument to the court went like this: Julie told him that she was in a relationship with… Read more »

Winning Women’s Rights: A question of reform or revolution?

Summer/Autumn 2005

Two days after the re-election of the Howard Government on October 9, Radical Women hosted a discussion about how to achieve women’s liberation. The election outcome injected a new sense of energy and determination. While participants had encountered gloomy voters, shattered and demoralised by a fourth Howard Government, all had met others who had decided… Read more »

Sexism and ageism place women of all ages on the frontlines for freedom

Summer/Autumn 2005

Here we are, in the 21st century, and young women are still portrayed as sex objects. From billboards, TV and glossy magazines the image of slim, sexy women sells products, from breakfast cereals to men’s toiletries and anti-wrinkle creams. They grace the catwalks, showing off the latest expensive fashions. These are bodies that all women… Read more »

Reta Kaur, anti-war activist, wins her court case

Summer/Autumn 2005

After a trial, which went into a second day, Reta Kaur was found Not Guilty on 24 November 2004 of criminal damage worth $9,080 to two marble statues outside the U.S. Consulate in Melbourne. On March 20, 2003 she had written “The killing has started!” in red paint in a moment of shock and grief… Read more »