Posts in: Radical Women

Two initiatives to remember Errol Wyles Junior

Summer/Autumn 2007

Poet, Amelia Walker, came up with the idea of producing a zine to pay tribute to Errol Wyles Junior after she attended a screening of Black and White Justice, hosted by the Indigenous Social Justice Association (Melbourne Supporters Group). A major issue discussed that night was the lack of public awareness of how and why… Read more »

Water is a feminist issue

Summer/Autumn 2007

Victoria burning, Melburnians choking from the smoke, parched land everywhere. This is life in the southeast corner of the earth’s driest continent. Across the Pacific, on the U.S.-Canadian border, pre-Christmas storms flooded homes, cut power and blocked main roads. On Christmas day, post-tsunami Aceh and North Sumatra were once again under water and mud. These… Read more »

Why must women lead the unions into a General Strike? Because we can!

Winter/Spring 2006

One of my most worn and treasured T-shirts is from my union, the Australian Services Union. It’s hot pink with the message, “Strong unions need women.” If ever women were needed to put some kick into the union movement, it’s now! Now, when Howard’s WorkChoices law is being used with ever-greater viciousness. The kick needs… Read more »

Reproductive Rights: Report from the trenches in the ongoing war on women’s autonomy

Winter/Spring 2006

Outside Melbourne’s Fertility Control Clinic, a large banner that reads “Women will decide their fate!” stretches along the street. Placards call for free, 24-hour childcare, employer-funded paid maternity leave and equal pay for women. People shout, “Right to Life your name’s a lie, you don’t care if women die.” This is the defence cordon organised… Read more »

Same-sex relationship equality: Organising to win!

Winter/Spring 2006

Last June, Federal Member for Melbourne, Lindsay Tanner, told attendees at Pride Or Prejudice, a queer community forum, why the Australian Labor Party (ALP) had voted with the Howard Government to pass homophobic amendments to the Marriage Act. Not surprisingly, Tanner copped flack from queers angered by the bi-partisan support for the legislation which defined… Read more »

Howard takes aim at Land Rights in the Northern Territory

Winter/Spring 2006

Yvonne Margarula, the most senior member of the Mirrar Gudjehmi clan, became a household name during the struggle to stop the Jabiluka Uranium mine in the Northern Territory. Margarula and the Mirrar people were able to exercise their right of veto under the Aboriginal Land Rights (Northern Territory) Act 1976 (ALRA). They also had a… Read more »

A Lesson from a TelCo Centre: How IT workers defeated an individual contract

Winter/Spring 2006

Protesters waving placards and yelling slogans from a megaphone. Marching in the streets, massed anger and strength in numbers. Unionised, mobilised and determined collective strength. This is hopefully how most people envision a labour movement with the power to overturn the Howard Government’s WorkChoices regime. Inspired, organised action has created fearsome warriors prepared to stand… Read more »

Reproductive rights advocate calls for a radical solution to the Bush blues

Summer/Autumn 2005

The following column is adapted from a speech given by Bernadette Logue for Radical Women at a post-election panel discussion held at Seattle Central Community College. Logue is one of the organizers of Seattle RW’s action in defense of reproductive rights on January 22, the anniversary of the Roe v. Wade U.S. Supreme Court decision… Read more »

Abortion Rights Under Fire – It’s time to fight for total reproductive freedom

Summer/Autumn 2005

“Not the Church, not the State, women must decide their fate” is a popular chant at marches. It’s a golden oldie, unfortunately, because women have not won reproductive freedom. Since the re-election of the Howard Government, these words have become more urgent than ever. Health Minister Tony Abbott has teamed up with the likes of… Read more »

Reta Kaur, anti-war activist, wins her court case

Summer/Autumn 2005

After a trial, which went into a second day, Reta Kaur was found Not Guilty on 24 November 2004 of criminal damage worth $9,080 to two marble statues outside the U.S. Consulate in Melbourne. On March 20, 2003 she had written “The killing has started!” in red paint in a moment of shock and grief… Read more »