Posts in: culture & reviews

Injustice: Families struggle to hold cops to account for deaths in custody

Winter/Spring 2006

There’s something very familiar about the images in the documentary Injustice. We see grieving families and angry protesters demanding justice and a wall of racist indifference from authorities. The stories could be from Palm Island, Redfern or Perth. But they are actually from England, where more than a thousand people died in police custody between… Read more »

Ali’s story: Powerful weapon in the struggle for justice for refugees

Summer/Autumn 2006

“What we have is the Minister of Defence saying in the immediate post Tampa environment, don’t humanise the refugees.” This is a quote from the October 2002 Senate report on the “Children Overboard” affair. The Howard Government has deliberately tried to suppress individual stories of refugees — who are to be kept nameless and faceless…. Read more »

History provides invaluable lessons in how to stop fascism in its tracks

Summer/Autumn 2006

The Fight Against Fascism in the U.S.A., by James P Cannon, Farrell Dobbs, Joseph Hansen, Leon Trotsky and Murry Weiss, Resistance Books (2004), ISBN 1876646179, 237 pages, $19.95. In January 1997, a fascist outfit, National Action (NA), opened a bookshop in the multicultural Melbourne suburb of Fawkner. This development led to the reactivation of Campaign… Read more »

Arundhati Roy’s eloquent answer to the neoliberal spin doctors

Winter/Spring 2005

Arundhati Roy came to prominence when her first novel, The God of Small Things, won the 1996 Booker Prize for literature. She has gone on to write several works of fiction and non-fiction. Roy is an outspoken, internationally popular anti-globalisationist and Indian feminist. Her latest book, The Ordinary Person’s Guide to Empire, is a collection… Read more »

Uncharted Waters: Social Responsibility in Australian Trade Unions

Winter/Spring 2005

A significant theoretical contribution by Marx is the idea that workers are alienated from the product of their labour. Workers produce things, but at the end of the day it is the capitalist who owns what they produce.  Uncharted Waters is an important new book which features periods in Australia’s history when workers have collectively… Read more »

Is casualisation eating us up?

Winter/Spring 2005

Melbourne Workers Theatre (MWT) is a cutting edge theatre company with a brief to produce work “for, with and by working class and disenfranchised communities.” Andrea James, artistic director for the company says, “our theatre is rude, it’s naughty and it’s un-Australian. We’re hitting where it hurts.” James explains, “as the nation steels itself for… Read more »

Bob Brown: Not quite revolutionary

Summer/Autumn 2005

Bob Brown — environmental activist, turned Senator — has loomed large on the Australian political landscape for nearly three decades. In 1983, when the first issue of Outrage, a new gay and lesbian magazine, hit the streets, I was on the editorial board. We considered our interview with Brown to be something of a scoop…. Read more »

Stiff Gins flower

Summer/Autumn 2005

It’s been three years since Stiff Gins released their debut album, Origins. Kingia Australis, their latest offering, has been well worth the wait. When band member Emma Donovan (yes, cousin of Australian Idol Casey Donovan) left to pursue a solo career, the band had to rethink its approach. Their first album had a happy-go-lucky feel…. Read more »

Revolutionary Integration: A Marxist Analysis of African American Liberation

Winter/Spring 2004

My hometown, Guilford Connecticut, had one African American family. The only other family of colour was from Puerto Rico, brought in as cheap labour for Pinchbeck’s prosperous rose farm, just down the road from my house. We kids went to primary school together. Our education system didn’t provide much for special needs, so my eighth… Read more »