Australian Politics

The Co-option Game: Enterprise Bargaining to Extend Bosses’ Plunder

Summer/Autumn 1994

The Federal ALP introduced enterprise bargaining in 1991 to replace the pre-existing centralised “wage fixing” system. No longer do workers get regular wage adjustments. Instead, the only way of getting so-called wage “increases” is by “bargaining” with the boss. With the deck stacked against us.

Workers Demand More, Not Less

Summer/Autumn 1992

The connection between workers and users of public and community sector services is a natural alliance. The demands of the More, Not Less campaign, adopted at its public meeting in August 1991, reflects the diversity of support and the unity of our struggles.

Real Rape Law Campaign Gathers Momentum

September - December 1990

Rape is a largely unreported crime. And, given the myriad obstacles which a rape victim must endure, it is hardly surprising that many women decide not to notify the police. As a starting point, the law needs to be changed to mitigate the rape victim’s trauma from simply reporting the crime.

Hawke Government Declares Open Season On Migrants

September – December 1990

At the very time the government is laying the foundations for its anti-migrant witch-hunt, migrants are being blamed for everything, from the destruction of the environment to the crisis of the economy.

A letter from Kerry Browning

Summer/Autumn 1990

Both Radical Women and the Freedom Socialist Party have been actively supporting Kerry Browning in her campaign against a police harassment and a frame up. This is an edited version… Read more »

Stop the Witch-hunts Against Browning and Anderson!

Summer/Autumn 1990

Two Australian political activists, Kerry Browning and Tim Anderson, are fighting separate frame-ups by Australian intelligence’ forces in bizarre prosecutions against them. We know that the bourgeois state does not choose its targets randomly: its targets are activists in struggles considered to be threatening, or they are pretexts for the state to unleash attacks against mass struggles.

An Interview With Tim Anderson

Summer/Autumn 1990

“As to my case, I think that there is a wider sort of context of law and order that doesn’t just deal with terrorism or political activism but deals with economic crisis. I think that law and order generally speaking, law and order regimes are bankrupt political responses to broader social, economic and political [issues]…”

Labor’s “Graduate Tax”: Will It Make The Rich Pay?

Summer 1988/1989

The proposed graduate tax will see students paying between $4,500 – $18,000 for courses. But the graduate tax will hit ex-students on lower incomes much more heavily because it is a regressive tax. All students, rich or poor, will have to pay back the same. The total debt is not linked in any way to income but is based on a standard fee for the type of course undertaken.