Book Review

Transgender Warriors: Sure to shift consciousness

Summer/Autumn 1998

“Complex,” “groundbreaking,” “fascinating,” “amazing” and “transformative” are just a handful of the adjectives emblazoned across the back cover of Transgender Warriors. “Nobody will remain unaffected by this book,” predicts critic… Read more »

Say It Loud: Male, Feminist and Proud! A Social Feminist Critiques Men and Sexual Politics

Summer/Autumn 1998

Bob Pease’s Men and Sexual Politics: Towards a Profeminist Practice is an important record of the anti-sexist men’s movement in Australia. Pease himself has at least 20 years’ experience in raising men’s consciousness about gender injustice. He helped form Men Against Sexual Assault (MASA) in Melbourne in 1989 and has been involved in its sexism awareness education program for men. Since 1989 Pease has taught a course called “Men, Masculinity and Anti-Patriarchal Practice” to women and men Social Work students at Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology (RMIT).

Stealing Moments for Poetry

Summer/Autumn 1998

Nellie Wong is a citizen of the world. An off-hand comment by her boss, a skin irritation, a homeless person on the street, the smell of food cooking or tanks in Tiananmen Square . . . all these scenes from working class life are her inspirations. Her work is complex, evocative and rich with imagery.

Positively Angry

Summer 1992/1993

Positive Women: Voices of Women Living with AIDS edited by Andrea Rudd and Darien Taylor, Second Story Press, Canada 1992, 269 pages This is not a feminist book. Or at… Read more »

Andrea Dworkin, Intercourse, New York, Free Press (1988). 326 pages.

Summer/Autumn 1990

Dworkin offers no hope for women. She identifies “contextual reforms” and political programs, only to dismiss them as off-base and futile. So, she indiscriminately lumps together demands for economic equity or rape laws that work with calls for electing women to political office and athletic excellence, condemning them all for failing to “address the question of whether intercourse itself can be an expression of sexual equality.”