Posts in: culture & reviews

Bob Brown: Not quite revolutionary

Summer/Autumn 2005

Bob Brown — environmental activist, turned Senator — has loomed large on the Australian political landscape for nearly three decades. In 1983, when the first issue of Outrage, a new gay and lesbian magazine, hit the streets, I was on the editorial board. We considered our interview with Brown to be something of a scoop…. Read more »

Stiff Gins flower

Summer/Autumn 2005

It’s been three years since Stiff Gins released their debut album, Origins. Kingia Australis, their latest offering, has been well worth the wait. When band member Emma Donovan (yes, cousin of Australian Idol Casey Donovan) left to pursue a solo career, the band had to rethink its approach. Their first album had a happy-go-lucky feel…. Read more »

Revolutionary Integration: A Marxist Analysis of African American Liberation

Winter/Spring 2004

My hometown, Guilford Connecticut, had one African American family. The only other family of colour was from Puerto Rico, brought in as cheap labour for Pinchbeck’s prosperous rose farm, just down the road from my house. We kids went to primary school together. Our education system didn’t provide much for special needs, so my eighth… Read more »

Helen Keller: A Rebel Life

Winter/Spring 2004

What do you know about Helen Keller? Most likely that she was blind and deaf and overcame huge obstacles to learn to communicate by working with a dedicated teacher, Anne Sullivan. What you may not know is that she was a socialist activist, a feminist and fierce opponent of World War I. She was also… Read more »

Black Paradise: Singing for self- determination

Winter/Spring 2004

Singing can be a very dangerous activity in West Papua. In 1984 the bloated bodies of musicians Arnold Clemens Ap and Eddie Mofu were washed up onto a beach. They’d been tortured and killed by the Indonesia military. In 2001, Sam Kapissa died in suspicious circumstances, described officially as food poisoning. Many West Papuans believe… Read more »

Before Night Falls: Arthouse attack on revolutionary Cuba

Summer/Autumn 2002

The impact of the Cuban revolution on the world has been profound. It provides ordinary people a picture of life without capitalism and demonstrates the power we have to make this change. No wonder the United States wants so desperately to kill it. But nothing — not 42 years of economic blockade, military invasions, attempted… Read more »

Making music: The Bread & Roses of Life

Summer/Autumn 2002

Facing the Music is a cinema verité type documentary on the music department of Sydney University.  Shots of intense-looking students playing classical music. Passionate lectures on Beethoven. You might think that this is an odd kind of film for a radical paper to review. But it’s not. Facing the Music shows in detail, which is… Read more »

In and Out of Port: Workers’ power in action!

Winter/Spring 2001

April 7, 1998. A date which is burnt into the memories of countless activists from all around the world. The day that Patrick Stevedores, at Webb Dock Port Melbourne, locked out its entire unionised workforce. The naked anti-union aggression was breathtaking. Security guards wearing balaclavas and with dogs, charged in to clear the docks. The… Read more »

In Denial: The Stolen Generations and the Right

Winter/Spring 2001

Robert Manne has for many years been associated with anti-communism and a trenchant opposition to the Left in Australia. This has led to a tendency among leftists to dismiss him as just another apologist for rampant capitalism. The truth, as always, is more complex. In fact Manne has been a consistent liberal, believing in the… Read more »