Posts in: culture & reviews

Review of Hardly War — Memories of the “Forgotten War”

October 2016

Hardly War, by Don Mee Choi / Wave Books, 2016 / Illustrated; 97 pages Don Mee Choi is a South Korean poet, translator and anti-militarist now living in the U.S. Through a startling, kaleidoscopic collection of prose, poems, and photographs in her new book, Hardly War, she makes a powerful case against the U.S. justification… Read more »

Movie Review — Edward Snowden: from patriotic geek to NSA whistleblower

December 2016

Oliver Stone’s Snowden is a gripping dramatization of whistleblower Edward Snowden’s journey through the totalitarian madness of the CIA and National Security Agency (NSA). Commenting on the film, the director and co-writer blew a little whistle of his own. “They say we have freedom of expression; but thought is financed, and thought is controlled, and… Read more »

The art of Black working-class life

February 2017

After last year’s hashtag #OscarsSoWhite, it’s refreshing to see two fine films about African American working people. Loving’s true story shows a brave couple persevering with their 9-year Supreme Court case that finally struck down laws against inter-racial marriage in 1967. Fences, by playwright August Wilson, delves into the strengths and tensions of a Black… Read more »

BOOK REVIEW — Eleanor Marx: spotlight on a socialist feminist pioneer

April 2017

Read Rachel Holmes’ sensitive and absorbing biography of Eleanor Marx and you’ll fall in love with a radical heroine. In Eleanor Marx: A Life (Bloomsbury Press, 2015), the Karl Marx family and the 19th century socialist movement are vividly portrayed. Eleanor Marx is revealed as an important political leader, whom Holmes credits with being the… Read more »