Afghanistan: Rage breaks out against the occupation

Share with your friends










Submit

With media in the United States reporting daily about Iraq, one wonders about Afghanistan, the other international target of the U.S. “war on terror.” No news is good news, right? Wrong.

Since January, more than 1,300 people have died in Afghanistan, many of them civilians killed by U.S. bombs. And as in Iraq, the war is creating outrage and even armed revolt, which is increasing.

Fueling the resistance are atrocities by U.S. troops, a rising civilian death toll, and the failure of U.S.-backed President Hamid Karzai to tackle poverty or improve the lives of ordinary Afghans. The numbers of roadside bombings and suicide attacks against occupation troops are way up, four southern provinces are out of U.S. control, and entire villages are now run by a resurgent Taliban.

In May, U.S. air strikes killed scores of civilians in the village of Azizi. The U.S. claimed the villagers were being used as “human shields” by the Taliban, but even Karzai was forced to distance himself from his U.S. sponsors and call for an investigation. Also in May, huge demonstrations broke out in Kabul, the nation’s capital, after U.S. troops rammed their vehicles into traffic and opened fire on an unarmed crowd.

To counter the insurgency, occupation forces are launching an offensive called Operation Mountain Thrust against the provinces of Zabul, Helmand, Uruzgan, and Kandahar. This is designed to “root out” rebels and restore order in the south. Whether or not it succeeds, it will most certainly fuel more hatred of the occupation.

The chaos and devastation caused by the war has hit women and children especially hard. The United Nations Children’s Fund reports that about 600 children under the age of 5 are succumbing daily to preventable disease. Fifty women die every day from obstetric complications, and less than half of girls who should be in primary school are attending.

No wonder that the media buries this story!

Share with your friends










Submit