Prominent Feminists Evaluate Their Movement

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Seattle“I don’t think we’re at a crossroads — we’re at a dead end,” said Ti-Grace Atkinson, a founder of radical-feminism. “The crossroads was 1971, when the antiwar and civil rights movements disintegrated. With our former comrades gone, we turned inwards, upon ourselves.”

“The moderates back away from confronting the right wing,” said Rosa Morales, Chicana militant. “That leaves minority women and women radicals isolated in the fight for all women’s rights.”

“Women are at an impasse — they must choose between fascist reaction or socialism,” said Clara Fraser, pioneer revolutionary feminist. “The only salvation for the movement will be a strong and dynamic radical wing.”

The three theorists spoke at a forum on “Women’s Rights at the Crossroads” in early November. They all advocated a united front against the ultra-right antifeminists. Audience response focused on a comparison of radical-feminism and socialist feminism — whether sex or class is the key social category in the modern world.

Two hundred people attended, and the exciting forum, sponsored by Radical Women on a weeknight, didn’t adjourn until 1:30 a.m., testifying to the enormous interest in political analysis and ideological exchange of views about the destiny of the women’s movement.

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