U.S. betrayals of Kurds a warning to Kosovars

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Reliable allies are hard to come by for the Kurds, a nation of some 20 million people split up among the countries of Turkey, Iran, Iraq, Syria, and the former USSR. The refusal of governments on three continents to give safe haven to Kurdish Workers Party leader Abdullah Ocalan, leading to his kidnapping from a Greek embassy in Kenya by the Turkish government on February 16, is just the most recent example.

Of all the betrayals of the persecuted Kurds, those by the U.S. have been perhaps the most wounding. Time and again, the U.S. has promised support but abandoned the Kurds to slaughter. In Ocalan’s case, the U.S. provided the repressive Turkish regime with intelligence information that made the abduction possible.

Looked at in this light, the decision of Albanian Kosovars to refuse to accept the “help” of the U.S. — in the form of bombing strikes against Serbia — was a smart move. Apparently the Albanian Kosovars, who are 90 percent of the population in Serb-dominated Kosovo, are not falling prey to the flawed logic of “the enemy of my enemy is my friend.”

The U.S. government has no concern whatever for national minorities and oppressed nations except insofar as it can use their plight to further the interests of its ruling class. Anyone who doubts this has only to look at the ongoing U.S. genocide against Native Americans.

All that the intervention of large capitalist nations has ever brought to the Balkans is more bloodshed and division. The first step toward any rational solution is to get these vultures out of the picture.

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