EDITORIAL

Voting rights and gridlock by design

U.S. Senate chamber
The U.S. Senate chamber
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The U.S. Supreme Court recently ruled that stopping mythical voter fraud is more important than guarding against proven racist denial of ballot access. Its decision and the 28 bills passed in 17 states attacking the ability to vote are blatant attempts to smash a basic foundation of democracy.

Republicans have stalled two voting rights bills in Congress by threatening a filibuster. Democrats are pointing to this as a reason to compromise away significant pieces of the legislation. They are discussing accepting a requirement for a national voter ID card, which would wreak even more discriminatory havoc.

Isn’t is convenient for the ruling class that their system contains features able to stop the implementation of progressive measures in their tracks? Whether the blockage is “states’ rights,” a Congress or Supreme Court controlled by political dinosaurs, or a Democratic Party “held captive” by the filibuster or its own conservatives, the potential for gridlock is ever-present — at least when it comes to things that would benefit workers and oppressed people.

The fight for voting rights is important. The fight to change the rigged system? Even more so!

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