australia

Jabiluka Must Not Proceed!

Summer/Autumn 1999

The international spotlight is on Australia. The Howard government is hell-bent on allowing construction of the Jabiluka uranium mine at the Kakadu National Park. The United Nations World Heritage Committee has threatened to place Kakadu on the “World Heritage in danger list.” It has given the Howard government until April 15 to prove scientifically that… Read more »

Stop the War Against Iraq!

Summer/Autumn 1999

U.S. President Bill Clinton and British Prime Minister Tony Blair have again bombed Bagdad. They justified their 70 hours of terror by claiming that Iraq alone had used weapons of mass destruction and will use them in the future. What blatant lies! The U.S. dropped weapons of mass destruction on inhabited cites in 1945, when… Read more »

Injustice! The cases of Greg Brown and Heather Osland

Summer/Autumn 1999

On December 10, the High Court ruled on the appeal of Heather Osland against her 14-year sentence for killing her violent husband. In a 3-2 decision, the Court resolved that years of systematic, sadistic abuse were not enough to afford Heather, who feared for her life, the right to self-defence. This ruling, by an all-male… Read more »

Tenacity Pays Off: Nazi headquarters shut down!

Winter/Spring 1998

In April this year, after a 15-month battle, Campaign Against the Nazis (CAN) celebrated the closure of a Nazi organising centre in Melbourne’s northern suburbs. National Action (NA) is a Nazi outfit which occasionally emerges from the sewers of Australian politics. In January 1997, NA opened what it called a “bookshop” on Fawkner, a multicultural… Read more »

More Deaths In Custody: Private Prisons Profit from Misery

Summer/Autumn 1998

George Drinken died at the Port Phillip Prison in Laverton North, Victoria on 30 October 1997. The death at Port Phillip brings the total of deaths in custody in private prisons in Australia to at least 18. The position of State and Territory governments that private prisons would somehow be “better” than State prisons is… Read more »

“My life is mortgaged to the university”

Summer/Autumn 1994

Wendy Harper is a 22-year-old working class student from The Basin, who is studying first year humanities at Latrobe University. “One of the impacts of the education cuts is day students being forced to take classes in the evening, because the University is no longer prepared to fund both a day and evening class. Full-time… Read more »

“When a school closes, it can kill a community”

Summer/Autumn 1994

Susan Garrett is a TAFE student who lives in the small Gippsland town of Meeniyan. Her daughter, Liz, has just completed grade 6 at Meeniyan Primary School. “I’ve lived here for five years. I’ve had four children go through the state school system. I’m a firm believer in consultation and parent involvement. This year, Meeniyan… Read more »

“Job Satisfaction, It’s A Joke!”

Summer/Autumn 1994

Paula Pope is a sole parent who works as a sessional teacher. She teaches in the Associate Diploma of Community Development at Broadmeadows TAFE. “I get paid $23 per hour, but only for the time I spend in front of the class. I don’t get paid for preparation, or for administrative work or assessment. I… Read more »

“You have to be very assertive to get assistance!”

Summer/Autumn 1994

Nasrin Aidvandi, who was born in Iran, is studying Computing Information Technology at the Monash University, Caulfield Campus. “Although I intend to study full-time this year, I may find that, as a parent of a young child, I’m forced to drop some subjects. Tutorial times are allocated on a first-in basis. The most popular time… Read more »

“My work life became unbearable!”

Summer/Autumn 1994

In 1982 Karen Sellenger began teaching humanities in a technical school. She taught full-time in Melbourne’s northern suburbs until she took a “voluntary” redundancy package (VDP) in April 1993. I spoke to Karen, who is now unemployed, about how voluntary this was. “The school went through a ‘reorganisation.’ After the amalgamation, the new school was… Read more »